Weather Underground bomber unmasked--as NYC schoolteacher

Gary Buiso
The New York Post
3/29/2015

The “bomb guru” for the terrorist group the Weather Underground never served a day in jail — but he did spend decades teaching in New York City classrooms, a new book reveals.

Ronald Fliegelman built explosives for the Weather Underground, a far-left group that launched a domestic bombing campaign in the 1960s and ’70s, including one explosion inside NYPD headquarters.

DaysofRage

But when the group dissolved, Fliegelman managed to safely fade away into the square life. For 25 years, he worked as a public special-education teacher, retiring to a quiet life in Park Slope, Brooklyn, according to “Days of Rage: America’s Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence” (Penguin Press).

And he’s unapologetic about his past, according to author Bryan Burrough.

“Ron is proud of what he did,” he told The Post.

The Weather Underground first organized in 1969 as a splinter of the Revolutionary Youth Movement within the ’60s protest group Students for a Democratic Society.

 

 

The article continues at The New York Post.

 

 

 

Firefighters work at extinguishing the fire at a residence at 18 West 11th Street in the Greenwich Village section of New York, March 6, 1970, which was rocked by three explosions at midday. The first blast touched off the fire just before noon and two more explosions occurred after the arrival of firefighters at the two-alarm blaze in the four-story townhouse. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler)   Weatherman bombing.

Firefighters work at extinguishing the fire at a residence at 18 West 11th Street in the Greenwich Village section of New York, March 6, 1970, which was rocked by three explosions at midday. The first blast touched off the fire just before noon and two more explosions occurred after the arrival of firefighters at the two-alarm blaze in the four-story townhouse. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler)

 

 

Related:    Remembering the Vietnam War, 42 Years After U.S. Troops Withdrew

On this day, in 1973, the last of the U.S. troops withdrew from South Vietnam. The eight-year war was over.

Sort of.

Two months earlier, the United States, North and South Vietnam, and the Vietcong signed a peace agreement in Paris, ending the direct U.S. military involvement in Vietnam. Among the agreement’s provisions was a cease-fire throughout Vietnam and withdrawal of U.S. forces. But even before March 29, communists violated the cease-fire.

 

 

 

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